Newsletter

Professional and ethics resources

The Council has published many articles on a wide range of ethical issues to assist psychologists practice safely. The articles have now been collected in a digital compendium for ease of access and are likely to be a useful resource for both provisional and generally...

Working with people with Borderline Personality Disorder

The significant increase in community access to psychological services under the Medicare Better Access initiative has led to a growing number of people with Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) seeking treatment within private practice settings. Unfortunately, this...

Mandatory supervision processes with the Psychology Council of NSW

The Psychology Council of NSW is appointed by the NSW Governor to protect the public of NSW, by ensuring Psychologists practice safely, ethically and professionally. When a complaint is made about a Psychologist, it uses reflective, restorative and rehabilitation...

The Benefits and Pitfalls of using Social Media as a Psychologist

The Psychology Council of NSW has received numerous complaints over recent years related to practitioner’s use of social media. Here are some examples.- A complaint was received about a practitioner who disclosed the identity and diagnosis of a patient on an anonymous...

What is the Psychology Council of NSW?

The Psychology Council of NSW (Council) is one of 15 Health Professional Councils (Councils) that are registered under the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law (NSW) (National Law) which came into place in 2010 when registration and regulation of health...

Treatment reports: Do’s and don’ts

Psychologists providing treatment in clinical or counselling settings often receive requests from their clients for court reports. For example, an opinion may be sought about custody arrangements or parenting competency. Reports may also be requested for insurance or...

Clinical Supervision: Critical to Best Practice

Clinical supervision is a collaborative process that is integral to our training and professional development and identity as competent psychologists, whatever our stage of career. All training pathways involve intensive individual (and often group) supervision, which...

Mandatory notifications: changes to protect your health

An important part of being a health professional is getting the healthcare you need, without fear of a mandatory notification being made against you. The Health Practitioner Regulation National Law sets out the mandatory reporting obligations for registered health...

Client records - why they matter

The Council is increasingly concerned that the content of client records is significantly below the accepted professional standard. The standard is quite varied, and often so poor, that Council is taking this opportunity to remind psychologists of their obligations...

What are my mandatory reporting obligations?

Mandatory reporting is just that, mandatory. It is not optional . In NSW, psychologists’ mandatory responsibilities are prescribed under three pieces of legislation that cover three different types of mandatory reporting. The Children and Young Persons (Care and...

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